County to install cameras

Steve Schroeder
Steve Schroeder

By DOUGLAS MELVOLD

Staff Writer

dmelvold@mspress.net

Jackson County residents and visitors to the courthouse soon will be on camera—a security camera system, that is.

The county Board of Supervisors last week approved the purchase of a $51,000 surveillance system that will be installed in public areas of the courthouse, the sheriff’s office, including the detention center, and the Penrose Annex.

The system will maintain a two-week visual record of the cameras’ recordings.

 

The supervisors on April 26 unanimously approved a recommendation from three members of the county security advisory committee to purchase the system from Avigilon Corp. of Vancouver, British Columbia, for $50,838.

 

Continue Reading

 

Maquoketa's Abe Kinrade juggles farm life and basketball

By NICK JOOS

Sports Editor

mspsports@mspress.net

Abe Kinrade bends over and puts down the basketball — a rarity. 

He turns and enters a barn stall and picks up a day-old calf nestled in the straw. 

She’s all black except a small white spot on her left rear hip. She’s sharing the stall with her mother, a cow Kinrade helped raise. The mother’s name is Ellie and the little one’s called Junior. 

The calf’s legs dangle as Kinrade carries the young bovine to a bathroom scale waiting on the concrete next to the basketball.

 

The 6-foot-7 junior from Maquoketa steps up and weighs the calf, all while wearing rubber boots and a Maquoketa basketball practice jersey, two items 

 

Continue Reading

 

County jail faces shortage of space for inmates, supplies

By KELLY GERLACH
News Editor
kgerlach@mspress.net
The Jackson County Detention Center is lacking, according to Sheriff Russ Kettmann.
“We have nowhere to keep the inmates on work release separate. We can’t keep the sentenced and non-sentenced separate like the state wants. We don’t have the cell space to keep the felonies away from the misdemeanors,” he explained.
“Do you really want to house murderers in with someone who came in overnight for public intoxication?”
And that’s just for men.
If a woman is arrested and she isn’t “unruly,” she can sleep in a locked room separated from the jail cells, but only with a woman matron on guard. If not, the woman must be transported to a different jail, the sheriff said.
That costs money.
And if the county jail surpasses its maximum capacity of 12, additional suspects must be housed elsewhere.
That costs even more money.
“About three months ago we had 11 or 12 inmates here and had to send the overflow out. We spent $15,000 to house them somewhere else,” Kettmann said.

 

Continue Reading

 

Student welders may build amenities

By DOUGLAS MELVOLD
Staff Writer
dmelvold@mspress.net
People shopping, doing business or visiting Maquoketa’s downtown after the reconstruction project is completed may be able to park their bicycles in a rack, relax on a bench and drop trash in a receptacle, all built by Maquoketa Community High School students.
The Maquoketa City Council last week unanimously approved a proposal to work with Maquoketa Community High School welding classes and welding teacher Craig Burken to design and build the amenities for the newly reconstructed business district.

 

Continue Reading

 

Sacred Heart students package 4,200 meals

Cole Lovewell wears an apron, hair cap, plastic gloves and a huge smile as he and Sacred Heart teacher Mary Fromm dump rice into food packages for impoverished countries abroad.
Cole Lovewell wears an apron, hair cap, plastic gloves and a huge smile as he and Sacred Heart teacher Mary Fromm dump rice into food packages for impoverished countries abroad.

By KELLY GERLACH

News Editor

kgerlach@mspress.net

Sacred Heart students know how to count to 6: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6.

What they didn’t know until recently was that a child goes hungry in the time it took to count that high. Six seconds. 

Multiply that by 10. Every 60 seconds 12 children die from starvation.

And many times, that starving child is 5 or younger – the age of the kindergartners or preschoolers.

So the students aimed their math skills higher – to 4,200 to be exact. In about 40 minutes they packaged 4,200 meals for Kids Against Hunger Quad Cities, a program headed by John and Gail Kessler to provide nutritious food to impoverished children around the world.

Feeding programs, orphanages, schools and health care clinics are the program’s direct access to people needing nourishment.

“They typically serve this food in the school because if kids are getting food in school, the parents let them go to school,” Kessler explained.

As the students donned miniature aprons, head caps and plastic gloves, they watched the Kesslers and their helpers set up four bins, two on each side of an 8-foot table with a funnel in the center. 

 

Each bin contained dried soy, rice, vegetables with chicken flavoring, and 21 vitamins and minerals. Based on a recipe formulated by food scientists, a predetermined amount of each was placed into the funnel, which emptied into a plastic bag clutched by a pair of hands.

 

Continue Reading

 

State-mandated Medicaid changes force DAC, Inc. into job cuts, reduced revenue

Alex Smith lugs a bag filled with empty plastic milk jugs through the recycling center at DAC, Inc. in Maquoketa. He is one of about 50 people with special needs employed at the recycling center, which could close sometime next year unless DAC finds alter
Alex Smith lugs a bag filled with empty plastic milk jugs through the recycling center at DAC, Inc. in Maquoketa. He is one of about 50 people with special needs employed at the recycling center, which could close sometime next year unless DAC finds alter

By KELLY GERLACH

News Editor

kgerlach@mspress.net

About a half-dozen people with special needs sift through and sort bins of discarded trash – metal cans, advertisements, cardboard boxes, pop bottles and other plastics and glass.

They are among the 50 or more people with disabilities employed by DAC, Inc. in its Maquoketa recycling center. The individuals go about their daily work not knowing the jobs they depend on for a paycheck and socialization may no longer exist as of July 1, 2017. 

 

DAC officials are worried about the possible closing of the recycling center as well as anticipated decreases in revenue, both due in large part to Medicaid privatization, they said. They are so worried, in fact, they are scrambling for alternatives to maintain the level of care and services they currently provide to their clients.

 

Continue Reading

 

District reduces rate by $1

Brian Tabor, Maquoketa Community School Board President
Brian Tabor, Maquoketa Community School Board President

By KELLY GERLACH

News Editor

 

kgerlach@mspress.net

Property taxpayers will see a slightly larger reduction than expected in their property tax bill in the next fiscal year.

The Maquoketa Community School Board Monday evening approved a budget that will lower the district’s property tax rate by $1. The rate changes from the current $13.07 per $1,000 of assessed valuation to $12.07 per $1,000 in the upcoming fiscal year, which begins July 1.

The board received no verbal or written comments about the proposed budget during a public hearing at the start of the meeting. School board members did not comment.

The board last month published a budget that would have reduced the tax rate by 98 cents. Multiple unknown variables factored into that initial budget, including an unknown allowable growth rate and a pending $14 million bond referendum.

That budget was based on a 0 percent increase in supplemental state aid because the Iowa Legislature had not agreed on a state aid figure. The day after Maquoketa set its budget, the House and Senate set state aid at 2.25 percent. That means an additional $143,600 for the district.

 

A $14 million bond referendum would have increased the property tax rate. However, district voters last week defeated the issue.

 

Continue Reading

 



CLICK HERE

5/4/16

of the Maquoketa

Sentinel-Press

FEATURED

ADVERTISERS

Click on the ad for a direct link to their website

Local Blogs

Bringing the
Emily Frances back to Life

--------------------------------

TIM MELVOLD